Linda Hogan: Paisley Rekdal - Salt Lake City


Oct 21, 2020, 6:30 pm

Author

Linda Hogan: Paisley Rekdal

Book Title

The History of Kindness; Nightingale

City

Salt Lake City

Statewide Region

Venue

Zoom Conference Call
150 S State St STE 100
Salt Lake City , UT 84111-1749
Map [+]

Description

Join Chickasaw poet Linda Hogan and Utah Poet Laureate Paisley Rekdal for a poetry reading and conversation as part of the Utah Book Festival.

About the authors:

Linda Hogan (Chickasaw) Former Faculty at Indian Arts Institute, Writer in Residence for The Chickasaw Nation, and Professor Emerita from the University of Colorado, is an internationally recognized public reader, speaker, and writer of poetry, fiction, and essays. In July, 2014, DARK. SWEET. New and Selected Poems, was published from Coffee House Press. Her other books are Indios (Wings Press, 2012) INDIOS is a long poem and also a one woman performance piece) ROUNDING THE HUMAN CORNERS (Coffee House Press, April 2008, Pulitzer nominee) and the well-regarded novel PEOPLE OF THE WHALE (Norton, August 2008). Works include novels MEAN SPIRIT, a winner of the Oklahoma Book Award, the Mountains and Plains Book Award, and a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. This is a book about the oil book in Oklahoma, affecting numerous tribal nations SOLAR STORMS, a finalist for the International Impact Award, and and New York Times Notable Book of Year. POWER was also a finalist for the International Impact Award in Ireland. It was based on the killing of a Florida Panther, a most endangered species. Poems from Linda Hogan explore new and old ways of experiencing the vagaries of the body and existing in harmony with earth's living beings. Purchase a copy of Linda Hogan's latest collection of poetry, A History of Kindness at https://www.torreyhouse.org/a-history-of-kindness

Paisley Rekdal is the author of a book of essays, The Night My Mother Met Bruce Lee; the hybrid photo-text memoir, Intimate; and five books of poetry: A Crash of Rhinos; Six Girls Without Pants; The Invention of the Kaleidoscope; Animal Eye, a finalist for the 2013 Kingsley Tufts Prize and winner of the UNT Rilke Prize; and Imaginary Vessels, finalist for the 2018 Kingsley Tufts Prize and the Washington State Book Award. Her newest work of nonfiction is a book-length essay, The Broken Country: On Trauma, a Crime, and the Continuing Legacy of Vietnam. A new collection of poems, Nightingale, which re-writes many of the myths in Ovid's The Metamorphoses, was published spring 2019. Appropriate: A Provocation, which examines cultural appropriation, is forthcoming from W.W. Norton in Feb. 2021. She is the guest editor for Best American Poetry 2020.

This event is made possible with support from Torrey House Press and Utah Humanities.

Genre

Poetry

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