Utah Stories from the Beehive Archive

Beehive Archive - Utah Journey Stories

Dublin Core

Title

Beehive Archive - Utah Journey Stories

Subject

Journey Stories - including migration, mobility, transportation, or travel - to or from or through or within - Utah.

Description

Beehive Archive episodes produced in conjunction with the Smithsonian Museum on Main Street tour of the "Journey Stories" exhibition through Utah in 2014-2015. Episodes are created by the Utah Humanities Council and its community partners.

Creator

Utah Humanities Council edits and sources episodes for the production of the Beehive Archive.

Items in the Beehive Archive - Utah Journey Stories Collection

Unsung Heroes and Heroines of Utah Agriculture
Migrant workers from Mexico have long contributed to Utah’s agricultural success. Their labor has been essential to the rural economy of the state.Utah has long relied on migrant labor for its agricultural success. In 1918, for example, sixty…

Monticello's Hispanic Pioneers
In 1899, Ramon Gonzalez, his wife Guadalupe, and his children Romana and Prudencio, left their home in Dixon, New Mexico, to settle in Monticello, Utah. A wagon carried all their household possessions, while a few head of livestock followed on the…

My Life on Three Continents: Jewish Refugees in Utah
Utah has become home to people of many backgrounds and cultures since the first Mormon Pioneers arrived in the Salt Lake Valley in July 1847.  What brought these people to Utah?  The convoluted journey of one family is told in Fred Linden’s…

Intermountain Indian School
The “I” is fading fast on the mountainside above Brigham City, Utah. Winter snows threaten to erase it for good and with it, the memory of one of Utah’s more significant stories: The Intermountain Indian School, a federally-run Native American…

Jewish Pioneers of Clarion
On September 10, 1911, twelve Jewish families arrived in Gunnison, Utah, to establish a Jewish agricultural community.  The group was part of the “Back to Soil” movement, which believed Jews needed to leave the city and live on farms. The…

The Crossing of the Fathers
One of the goals of the Dominguez-Escalante expedition was to find a northern route to the Spanish missions in Monterey, California from the Spanish colonial stronghold of Santa Fe, New Mexico.  Led by two Franciscan friars named Silvestre Velez de…

The Adventure of Bobby Donohue
Any parent who has ever lost a youngster in a crowd can imagine Park City resident Bridget Donohue’s panic when she couldn’t find her thirteen-year-old son, Bobby.  Believing he had gone to nearby Heber in the fall of 1898, Bridget must have…

The Bear River Massacre
The Bear River Massacre was an event that changed the landscape of northern Utah and the fate of the Shoshone people.In the early morning cold of January 29, 1863, between 270 and 400 Shoshone men, women, and children were killed by the U.S. Army…

Utah Journeys: Finding a Way Through
Migration and travel have shaped Utah. And Utah has shaped the way we migrate and travel. Literally. Over time, travel routes through Utah have tended to stay the same.   Utah’s ruggedly beautiful landscape draws admiration and visitors, but has…

Edwin Bryant's Mule Ride
Nine men riding mules journeyed across the Great Salt Lake Desert in a single scorching August day.   On August 3, 1846, Edwin Bryant woke up at 1:30 a.m.  The silence around him seemed ominous.  Camped this night on the Cedar Mountains at the…

Martha Sharouk’s Journey to America
The journey of Martha Sharouk – a young wife who left Lebanon and travelled to Utah to begin a new life – did not quite go as planned… In the winter of 1913, a young Lebanese woman stepped off the train at the Denver and Rio Grande station in…

Porters & Waiters Club: Worth the Trip to Ogden
Americans love their entertainment. But how far would you travel for a bit of fun? Here’s why a music club on Ogden’s 25th Street became a place worth traveling to. The rousing nightlife of cafes and clubs of the mid-twentieth century conjures…

The Gypsies are Coming!
Traveling gypsies brought excitement to small towns all over Utah in the early 1900s.   To most residents of rural Utah in the early 1900s, summertime meant hauling hay, digging ditches, irrigating crops, and tending livestock.  Other than the…

Adventures of an Early Hot Rodder
In the early days of motoring, traveling by automobile was all about adventure.    America’s love affair with the automobile began with young men like Alva Matheson.  Born in Cedar City in 1903, Alva Matheson began hankering for a car at age…

The Journey of Gobo Fango
Gobo Fango, an enslaved boy from southern Africa, journeyed to Utah in 1861.    Born about 1855 near the Cape of Good Hope in what is now the Republic of South Africa, Gobo Fango was shaped by hardship.   While still a small child, Gobo Fango’s…

"Tieing" Utah Together
Utah’s mountain ranges were raided and its rivers put to work in order to build the national railroad system.  When the transcontinental railroad came to Utah in 1868 and 1869 – and as branch lines later spread through the territory – railroad…

Uranium Stories
Those who journeyed to Moab during the uranium mining boom that swept Utah in the 1950s and 1960s changed the tiny town forever.   When the Atomic Energy Commission wanted uranium in the late 1940s, its guarantee to purchase whatever could be found…

Speaking American
Utah's pivotal 1919 Americanization Act impacted the state's vibrant immigrant population.   When the thirteenth session of the Utah Legislature closed in March 1919, new legislation included a $4 million bond for new roads, a law preventing…

Modern Tourism: The Comforts of Home in Nature
Utah’s booming tourism industry grew by attracting travelers with creature comforts that rivaled the scenery.  In the early twentieth century, Utah’s exceptional landscape drew Americans seeking to connect with nature and untamed wilderness. …

William Rishel’s Bike Ride
The 100-mile summer bike ride of William Rishel and Charlie Emise across the Great Salt Lake Desert almost ended in disaster.  In 1896, to promote his growing chain of national newspapers, publisher William Randolph Hearst cooked up a wildly…